Archive

Archive for the ‘south’ Category

The Capital of Tennessee is Nashville (Day 108)

November 4th, 2009 No comments

It’s a pretty capitol and the Bicentennial Mall around it is likewise nicely done. After a few hours, I felt I knew everything there was to know about Tennessee history (through 1996). Apparently Piggly Wiggly, the first self-service grocery store, is a product of Tennessee. Also the UT women’s basketball team won an NCAA title some time. And Tennessee took part in some war in the 1860s. It’s all fading now.

I don’t have much of a connection with Tennessee or anything, but I was in Nashville for a few hours after taking my mom to the airport and before heading over to Rich’s place for dinner, so what else was I gonna do?

Good weather also, btw.

nashville-fountainNot that any of these photos illustrate the fact, but Tennessee is a state obsessed with its own weird shape. And this is a fountain that for some reason symbolizes rivers or something.

nashville-capital-leavesDas Capitol. At which point even *I* will concede that my captions have jumped the shark.

nashville-capital-halfHalf-capitol.

nashville_dunn-tennDunn, Tennessee and Dunn, me.

nashville_parthenon-cornerBecause Nashville is the “Athens of the South”, according to Nashville.

Seems like maybe Athens, Ga. would be the “Athens of the South”. Meh. I wonder how either of them would fare against Sparta. Someone should develop a simulator. I also walked around Vanderbilt campus for a while and decided that it looked like a college campus.

And then dinner with Rich & Jen was great.

And to all a good night.

bkd

Categories: south Tags: , , ,

Natchez Trace Route: Still No Sign of Bandits (Day 107)

November 4th, 2009 1 comment

I’m getting close to as behind on blog posts as I’ve been all trip. Woot!

More photos from the Natchez Trace Parkway. It continued to be a road with stuff to see on either side of it. Day 107 wasn’t rainy. We had peanut butter and jam samiches for lunch. What else is there to tell, really? I know, you’re just here for the photos. Punks.

natchez-trace_tishomingo-lillypadsTishomingo lily pads.

natchez-trace_tishomingo-bridgeThe nearly-invisible swinging bridge.

natchez-trace_trace-sunI can’t tell if this photo is interesting, unsettling, or just bad. I guess none of those are mutually exclusive from any of the others.

natchez-trace_meriwether (1)Meriwether Lewis died here.

natchez-trace_fall-hollow (1)Fall Hollow Falls.

natchez-trace_jackson-fallsJackson Falls.

natchez-trace_tenn-farmsTennessee countryside.

I should probably do some sort of study about blog post quality and previous-night sleep. It was about 35 degrees last night, but mostly both my hips are sore from — I dunno. Lying on the ground without enough padding, I guess, and that’s apparently my personal COG.

Wishing you a safe, lucrative Guy Fawkes Day tomorrow,

bkd

Natchez Trace, Part One (Day 106, Part 2)

November 3rd, 2009 No comments

How much do you want me to explain about the Natchez Trace? I’m guessing *this* much:

The Natchez Trace is a trail that runs from Natchez, Miss. to Nashville, Tenn., about 450 miles. It was used most famously by late 18th- and early 19th-century traders from Tennessee and points north, who would ship their wares down the Mississippi river to Natchez or New Orleans, sell them there, then sell the barge for scrap and walk home.

About right, right?

Then they built this parkway that follows the course of the Trace, which is what we were driving on. It features the trace itself (it’s just a trail) as well as some sights.

natchez-trace_burial-moundThis Indian burial mound, for instance.

natchez-trace_windshieldBTW, it rained all day — usually hard.

natchez-trace_mt-locust-innMt. Locust Stand — $0.25/night just 180 years ago.

natchez-trace_rocky-springs-churchRocky Springs, population 0 (not counting the 999 ghosts).

natchez-trace_windsor-pillarsWindsor Ruins — survived the war, but not the fire.

natchez-trace_swamp-surfaceThe swamp walk was the best part of the day.

natchez-trace_swamp-treesAlthough we didn’t see any alligators.

natchez-trace_swamp-bridgeYes, that’s what color the water is.

Ended up staying the night in Starkville. It was a Friday night, but fortunately, Mississippi State was on the road, so hotel rooms were plentiful enough. And Sonic was better than I remembered it.

bkd

Natchez: City of a Dozen Mansions (Day 106)

November 2nd, 2009 No comments

Some of these were taken on the evening of Day 105. Most of them, actually. Because it wasn’t raining on the evening of Day 105. Which may cause you to wonder why this is labeled Day 106. Life is full of many mysteries.

Natchez is in Mississippi. It’s where the Natchez Trace starts. The Natchez Trace is a trail that runs from Natchez to Nashville. I’m not sure why it’s not the Nashville Trace.

natchez_rundown-houseA run-down house with river view.

natchez_magnoliaThe Magnolia House.

natchez_stantonThe Stanton House.

natchez_rosalie-exteriorThe Rosalie House. We visited this one on Day 106. That’s why.

natchez_rosalie-interiorInterior of the Rosalie House. No one important lived there.

natchez_rosalie-pianoMy mom making the tour guide happy.

Natchez was kind of a cool little city, actually. Every other house was on the historic places registry. Sort of like New Orleans, but without the trash and only 80-percent humidity. Nah, actually the houses are more traditional southern than New Orleans — fewer wrought iron railings, more neo-classical columns. Supposedly, at one time in the early 19th century, like a third of all American millionaires lived there. It’s less than that now.

Also, you can’t easily find the start of the Natchez Trace Parkway when you’re there. It’s not like they have signs telling you where to go. As such, we started at Mile Post 8 (more to come!).

bkd

Road Trip Hurricane Wreaks Havoc with New Orleans (Day 105)

November 2nd, 2009 2 comments

Fortunately my headlines jumped the shark a couple months ago, so no need to feel embarrassed by this one.

My mom flew out to New Orleans to join the road trip for a few days, btw. She was the one who insisted we go to the French Quarter. Well, “insisted”. Anyway — it was everything everyone told me it would be (i.e., “a bunch of old buildings and it smells like vomit”).

I’m sure it smelled better before Katrina.

We had a cool hotel, in no small part because the room had its own loft.

new-orleans_hotel-roomSee? Loft.

(Prytania Park Hotel — it’s located right in between the Garden District and Warehouse+Museum District.)

Then we walked to the French quarter.

new-orleans_underpassThere was an underpass along the way!

new-orleans_bike-riderThey have porches like this there.

new-orleans_white-doorA door as crooked as a Louisiana politician.

new-orleans_cathedralSt. Louis Cathedral and tourists taking photos of same.

new-orleans_jackson-sq-carriagesTour carriages lined up at Jackson Square.

I learned that Jackson Square was *meant* to be the town’s center. And then the person who ended up owning the land built buildings on either side of it, but that it wasn’t pretty enough — so she had it beatified (park ranger’s word, not mine).

And I’m still waiting for someone to explain why Andrew Jackson doesn’t net out to be a villain for killing all the Indians he did. (In protest, I no longer use $20 bills.)

new-orleans_cannon-me (2)Me with cannon. Cannon with me.

new-orleans_bourbon-voodooI’m thinking about opening my own voodoo shop in Mission Viejo.

new-orleans_kimball-homeThe New Orleans house my mom grew up in lived in for two years as a kid.

Anyway.

I think the people that love New Orleans so much are people who first went there in college with all their friends and got drunk and partied so that now every time they go there, they remember being 19 and getting drunk and partying with their friends.

It’s basically how I feel about Hohenstein-Ernstthal.

(No, I never got drunk in Hohenstein-Ernstthal — except on my own sense of self-importance, which is much headier anyway.)

Out,

bkd

Welcome to Louisiana, Bienvenue en Louisiane (State #38)

November 1st, 2009 2 comments

Finally made it to a French-speaking state!

welcome-louisianaThis is a photo caption.

Next stop: New Orleans.

bkd

Categories: south Tags: ,

Mississippi, The Birthplace of American Music (State #37)

November 1st, 2009 No comments

Thirty-seven down, 11 to go!

I deleted the Mississippi photo, sorry. Not on purpose. I could go into a detailed discussion of the circumstances that led to the deletion, but the story is so fraught with peril, you would surely perish from the hearing.

OTOH, is Mississippi really the “birthplace” of American music? Aside from Elvis being born in Tupelo… what? Oh well.

bkd

Categories: south Tags:

Alabama the Battleship and Friends (Day 104)

October 30th, 2009 No comments

Last military museum for a while. Well — till Texas. That seems like a while, but it’ll probably be like a week and a half.

The USS Alabama is a WW2 battleship that was used for five years, then sat mothballed for another 15 before getting towed to Mobile, Ala., where it became a “museum”. Sort of the martial-maritime version of the Biltmore Estate, except for the entry fee was 82% less and it wasn’t the home/play-thing of a useless trust-fund nerd. If you want to know what a WW2-era battleship was like, this is a fantastic ship-museum. They let you touch a lot of stuff and climb on things.

They also have a WW2-era submarine there, the USS Drum.

uss-alabama_uss-drumAs an added bonus, this photo also shows Mobile’s skyline. Seriously, it’s there.

uss-alabama_periscopeThe periscope actually works. You can see the Alabama through it. You can order someone to fire torpedoes at the Alabama, but nothing happens, at which point the fantasy breaks down.

They let you climb up into the conning tower, which is pretty cool. There are also a lot of levers and knobs you can manipulate to your heart’s content (depending on your heart). This would’ve been the greatest field trip ever if I were still in grade school.

Also there’s sort of a flight museum. Or at least, there are some planes parked in a hangar there.

uss-alabama_f15-f16Any color you want, so long as it’s gray.

uss-alabama_yf-17“See that white plane over there? The one that’s the only legitimately unique thing we have in this place? Yeah, that one. How ’bout you go ahead and throw all those folding chairs next to it. There you go.”

The plane’s a YF-17, one of two prototypes that were originally developed for the Air Force, which rejected them in favor of the F-16. Then the Navy needed something small, so had Northrop re-develop it into the F/A-18 that has since grown up considerably to where it’s now not small at all. Anyway — nice folding chairs. Hope that airplane’s not getting in the way of your spare television set.

Then battleship.

uss-alabama_stackRoll, Tide!

uss-alabama_16-inch-shells16-inch shells are pretty big actually.

uss-alabama_stack-and-semiforeSome day I hope to learn semaphore so I can quit wondering whether a ship is talking about me.

uss-alabama_bob-fellerWell he did. And he’s basically the Ted Williams of right-handed pitchers.

uss-alabama_turret-meManning my self-selected battle station.

Other things I feel like typing right now:

  • The Alabama is a fantastic artifact, especially so given that it was never updated after WW2 and therefore has its 1942 almost completely intact.
  • Being allowed to crawl all over it is awesome. For instance, you can crawl into all three of the sixteen-inch turrets. Never done that before.
  • Some time I’d like someone to explain exactly what it is that makes up the smell inside a big, retired navy vessel. I’m guessing it’s oil, grease, and seawater, but — it’s just a guess.
  • A WW2-era battleship would make for an unbelievable haunted house, I think.
  • They claimed that the ship went through 1,000 gallons of ice cream a day, despite having a crew of only (“only”) 2,000. Raises at least a couple of concerns for me.

The Pacific War Museum is the one in Texas. It’s the only one I got left this trip. Sadly. I skipped the WW2 one in N.O. If you’ve been there and it’s great, please don’t tell me now.

Thx,

bkd

Welcome to Alabama the Beautiful (Signed) [Self-Important Politician] (State #36)

October 30th, 2009 3 comments

Maybe it’s like you’re supposed to feel like the governor is the person responsible for the state you’re entering, so you know who to go talk to if you find yourself dissatisfied with, say, Alabama. Maybe the governor is the state’s CSR-in-Chief.

Photo:

welcome-alabamaBased on what criteria “beautiful”?

Went to Mobile. Stayed in a hotel. Watched baseball on TV.

bkd

Categories: south Tags: ,

My Day at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola (Day 103)

October 28th, 2009 9 comments

Here’s how my Day 103 started:

pensacola_rainAnd thus the Blue Angels canceled their practice session.

It supposedly rained like three inches in Pensacola that morning, which seems like a lot. We were the top news on the Weather Channel that day. That’s right, The Weather Channel. Which, btw, has some good-looking on-screen personalities.

pensacola_museum-entry-rainOne day I’m going to find a flag that’s not flying at half-mast. Maybe.

pensacola_museum-glingFiercest of the Navy’s 1920s night-fighters: the Gling.

pensacola_f8f-cowlingF8F.

pensacola_sbd-dauntlessDauntless.

pensacola_p-40-tomahawkCome to think of it, we may have already been fighting Japan when they attacked Pearl Harbor.

pensacola_many-tailsIt’s like a tails and folded wings convention in there.

pensacola_artworkNavy art. I like the composition.

pensacola_blimp-videoI am deeply concerned about naval blimpery.

pensacola_wide-viewAny color you want, so long as it’s navy blue.

pensacola_t-28Trainer.

pensacola_blue-angelsForever stuck in formation.

pensacola_museum-entranceIt eventually stopped raining.

pensacola_chopper-rowChopper row.

pensacola_fat-albertFat Albert: always a crowd-pleaser.

pensacola_door-21You asked me once, what was in Room 21. I told you that you knew the answer already. Everyone knows it. The thing that is in Room 21 is the worst thing in the world.

pensacola_blue-angel (1)Yes, it *does* seem to be listing to port.

Beyond that:

  • The museum is actually on-base, which I thought was very cool.
  • I think the one thing this museum has going for it that no other flight museum has is the Blue Angels practices. Which get canceled when it rains three inches.
  • The museum has some usability issues, for instance: some of the displays are hard to read (see: “gling”); it was difficult to tell what the organization at the museum was meant to be — there are grouped displays, but their locations seem randomly selected; and some of the aircraft did not seem to have signs describing them.
  • Dave, our flight line tour guide, was exactly what you want a retired-Marine tour guide to be. Well done, very entertaining.
  • For some reason the four Blue Angels displayed in the museum (the old A-4s) are angled in a downward attitude. Seems sort of wrong.
  • The other thing this museum has that I thought was unusual and pretty cool was the artwork. They got a ton of artwork and a lot of it rulz — especially the WW2 stuff, which covered subjects I always thought should’ve been covered on canvas, but which I hadn’t seen before. Wish the National Museum of the Marine Corps had had that (seems like it’d be the rightful place for some of these, for instance — or maybe I just failed to notice them there).
  • I don’t think this museum quite nailed The Navy’s Big Moment (IMHO, that’d be Midway). I mean, they talk about it, but it doesn’t come alive or command attention the way you’d think it should. IMHO. Always IMHO.

But it was fun. Again, I thought it was particularly great that the museum was on-base.

It was also interesting to me that the base has its own lighthouse (what base doesn’t?):

pensacola_lighthouseIt keeps PBYs from hitting the control tower, I assume.

Once I got over the lighthouse, I left the base and headed to Warrington, which is where my parents lived when my dad was stationed in Pensacola. This is what the house looks like now:

pensacola_505-e-sunsetI like the gully.

Anyway — big day of naval aviation. And it’s still sort of disappointing to go to these places where my parents (and siblings) lived before I was born and then to find them to not be stuck in the era in which my family lived there. I mean, how hard would it be for Pensacola to pull off 1961? Oh well: maybe next year.

bkd

телефонный справочник минска on-line волгоградский справочник найти телефон по адресу г орёл как найти по адресу номер телефона в г брянск телефонная база мариуполь найти по адресу и по фамилии номер сотового телефона поиск людей по адресу краснодар бесплатный телефонный справочник beeline здесь получить адрес через номер телефона как узнать по ip-адресу местоположение узнать тут телефонная база данных квартир местоположение мобильного телефона билайн сальск справочник телефонов тут перехватчик звонков и смс телефонная справочник телефонов могилева онлайн как узнать справочник телефонов г бердск помогите найти человека по номеру телефона мтс тут поиск фирм по номеру телефона москва справочник телефонов челябинской области троицк телефонная база с мобильными калининград найти утерянный телефон справочник телефонов верхней пышмы г братск справочник телефонов телефонная поиск людей по фамилии и номеру телефона найти местонахождение человека на номеру телефона поиск человека по городу и фамилии адресно телефонная база данных новосибирска ссылка тут телефонный справочник адрес по телефону г вологда ссылка поиск места телефона по номеру как найти человека по его имени и фамилии смс шпион смс перехватчик читаем чужие смс сообщения здесь адрес абонента по фамилии найти местонахождение человека на номеру телефона sitemap